US Army Corps of Engineers
San Francisco District

Coyote Valley Dam, Lake Mendocino

COYOTE VALLEY DAM, LAKE MENDOCINO
OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

 

PROJECT LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION

Lake Mendocino is located approximately five miles northeast of Ukiah in Mendocino County, California. The Coyote Valley Dam (also known as Coyote Dam) project was authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1944 and completed in 1958 for purposes of flood control, water supply, and recreation.  Local agency uses the dam’s non-flood releases for downstream-flow regulation.  Congressionally authorized mitigation for effects on the endangered fish cause by the dam was added in the mid 1970’s.  Lake Mendocino has a flood storage capacity of 122,400 acre-feet and a total surface area of 1,822 acres.  Major facilities include an anadromous endangered and protected fish species egg collection and imprinting facility, visitor center, park headquarters, sponsor-run electrical power plant (hydropower), developed campgrounds (300 sites), primitive boat-in or hike-in campsites (18), a trail system, two boat launch ramps, swimming beach, and picnic areas. Of the park’s 5,110 acres, 689 acres are devoted to wildlife management. This park normally receives over 970,000 visitors a year and annually collects normally run approximately $300,000 to $400,000 in user fees, which are returned to the Treasury.  The drought has caused a decline in visitation.

 

TOTAL FUNDING

 

TOTAL COST

                                 N/A

FEDERAL COST

                                 N/A

NON-FEDERAL COST

                                 N/A

   

FISCAL YEAR 2019 ALLOCATION

                    $ 3,540,000

FY 2020 BUDGET

                    $ 3,704,000

COST TO COMPLETE

                                 N/A

 

FY 19 AND FY 20 ACCOMPLISHMENTS (based on the availability of funds)

  • Funds are being used for commonly performed O&M work.

ISSUES AND OTHER INFORMATION

  • The fish imprinting facility at this project is operated in conjunction with the fish hatchery at Warm Springs Dam (Dry Creek project).   The Warm Springs Hatchery supports the last stock of the California Central Coast Coho.  If this stock was to perish the subspecies would become extinct.  A reconnaissance study and a Continuing Authorities Program study were initiated in FY 2014 to evaluate opportunities to comply with the Russian River 2008 Jeopardy Biological Opinion, including enhancement of nationally and regionally scarce wetlands and riparian habitat.  A reconnaissance report was completed in FY 2014.

CONGRESSIONAL INTEREST

  • 2nd District, Rep. Jared Huffman

POINT OF CONTACT

  • Deputy for Project Management, Edwin S. Townsley, (415) 503-6593.

Updated on 31 January 2019

 

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Contact

General Questions
415-503-6708
450 Golden Gate
San Francisco, CA 94102