Results:
Archive: 2022
Clear
  • May

    Lake Sonoma continues expanded “No Wake Zones”

    GEYSERVILLE, Calif. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Lake Sonoma is continuing the expanded no wake zones established in 2021 to keep boaters safe during historic low water levels this recreation season. With increasing underwater hazards, boats will not be allowed to travel more than 5 mph or produce a wake in the Warm Springs arm of the lake, beginning at the Rockpile Road Bridge. The Dry Creek arm will also continue expanded no wake zones beginning upstream of Falcons Nest Campground. Normal boating operations will be allowed between Falcons Nest Campground and Rockpile Road Bridge. These zones will remain in effect until the lake level increases to a safer pool elevation.
  • Controlled Burn Scheduled for Lake Sonoma’s Warm Springs Dam

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, in conjunction with Northern Sonoma County Fire Protection District (NSCFPD) and Santa Rosa Junior College, are planning to conduct a controlled burn training at Lake Sonoma’s Warm Springs Dam from Wednesday, June 1 – Friday, June 3. This event serves to help train firefighters how to conduct controlled burns, and to allow for mandatory safety inspections of the earthen dam. Periodic episodes of smoke may be visible each day during the training course.
  • Register Now for Environmental & Climate Justice Webinar June 7, 11 a.m. PT,

    Please join the US Army Corps of Engineers San Francisco District and National Flood Risk Management Program on June 7 from 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. PT (12p MT, 1p CT, 2p ET) for “Out of harm’s way – without harm. Environmental and climate justice in flood buyouts and relocation.” This is the 7th webinar in our Bridging the Equity Gap Webinar Series.
  • Milt Brandt Visitor Center reopens May 20th

    Geyserville, CA. - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Lake Sonoma is pleased to announce the re-opening of the Milt Brandt Visitor Center to the public on Friday, May 20th. The Don Clausen Fish Hatchery and viewing bridge will remain closed until further notice.
  • DOE Partners with USACE to Safely Tear Down High Risk Building, Reactor at LLNL

    Two U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Districts and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management partnered with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to demolish a building and remove a reactor to make room for new facilities on the lab’s 1-square-mile footprint in Livermore, Calif. Since space is limited the lab must demo buildings that have outlived their purpose such as buildings B175 and B280, two high risk excess contaminated facilities. B280 housed the Livermore Pool Type Reactor, a neutron-producing machine used for fundamental research and to measure and calibrate instruments. Later, it was used for trace-element measurements, radiation-damage studies and researching shorter-lived fission products. San Francisco and Kansas City Districts, in an interagency agreement with EM, completed removal of the reactor from within the building. The reactor demolition work included characterizing and demolishing the reactor bioshield, reactor internals and support equipment.
  • April

    Learning how to meld environmental justice with flood risk management

    SAN FRANCISCO – The San Francisco District Flood Risk Management Program is partnering with experts, external agency staff, academics and other practitioners with a story to tell to help its personnel and others learn how to integrate equity and environmental justice into their work affecting historically marginalized or overburdened communities.
  • March

    San Francisco District’s Spencer Harper selected for ERDC University

    Researchers from five U.S. Army Corps of Engineer Districts have been selected for the 2022 session of the Engineer Research and Development Center University (ERDC-U). Coastal Engineer Spencer Harper with the South Pacific Division’s San Francisco District was chosen as a participant for this detail program, which is now in its seventh year.
  • January

    Army Corps of Engineers, UC Berkeley repatriate human remains to Wiyot Tribe

    SAN FRANCISCO – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers San Francisco District and the University of California, Berkeley, have successfully repatriated 20 human remains and 136 objects of historical, traditional and cultural importance to the Wiyot Tribe of Loleta, Calif. The collection resided in the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at UC Berkeley. The remains and associated items were uncovered in 1946 during construction activities related to the Humboldt Bay Jetties, which were built by the Corps. A cultural affiliation study conducted by Statistical Research Inc. for the Corps found the human remains were likely to be lineal descendants of the Wiyot people, based on ethnographic, linguistic, osteological and archaeological data. Further research conducted by UC Berkeley in 2021 indicated that these individuals were likely victims of the Indian Island Massacre, which took place on Feb. 26, 1860, when settlers attacked numerous Wiyot villages.